The Mochican Culture

The Moche were an agrarian society that relied on fishing. They occupied the coastline of northern Peru for around 700 years (100 - 800 AD). They are best known for their advanced agricultural knowledge (building large stepped platforms used for agriculture which are still in use today) and their pottery.

Moche pottery was mass produced in molds and depicted everything the culture seemingly found important. There were also many "portrait vases"; pottery vessels made to resemble a person's head. The principal characteristics of these artifacts are their cream and red colors. More about the Moche?


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Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 01
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 02
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 03
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 05
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 06
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 07
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 29
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 30
Pre-Hispanic (Pre-Columbian) Peruvian Huacos
Moche Huaco 31


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The Huacos Of Peru

The main language of the Andean people is Quenhuan. Prior to the Pre-Columbian (Pre-Hispanic) period of Peru, ceremonial pottery was buried with the dead. From the Quechua word "huaca" (meaning holy burial site), Peruvians now call the ancient ceramics found therein "huacos". The term is culturally generic; that is, it does not refer to a particular culture or time period of Peru.

Reproductions of Pre-Hispanic Huacos are especially popular with tourists, and can be typically found in markets and shops throughout Peru, and often on the streets from "huaqueros" (grave robbers). The Huacos offered here were obtained from many different sources over a period of many years during our travels throughout Peru. Some are obviously reproductions. The authenticity of those obtained from street venders cannot be determined. Each is offered in an as is condition, many with either authentic aged nicks and discoloration or well crafted fakery.